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Netflix’s Squid Game is getting a board game later this month, because of course it is

Take that, Capitalism.

Irony be damned, Netflix’s Squid Game is being turned into a board game.

The upcoming Squid Game board game is based on the six rounds seen in Hwang Dong-hyuk’s hit Netflix show, with three to six players participating in deadly elimination challenges inspired by Korean children’s games.

The rounds include Red Light Green Light - including a deck of cards printed with the now-iconic giant doll - shape-tracing candy trial Dalgona, Tug of War, Marbles, Glass Bridge - where certain platforms shatter when stepped upon - and, finally, the Squid Game itself, based on South Korean playground game ojingeo.

In the board game, each player controls a team of up to 12 Squid Game contestants. After each game - said to last less than five minutes each - players have the chance to bolster their ranks by recruiting a new member. An element of betrayal is mentioned in the game’s description, with the blurb suggesting players can form temporary alliances before backstabbing each other for a shot at the prize.

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In order to win, at least one of the player’s contestants must survive all six games and reach the squid head on the Squid Game board. If multiple players make it through, the prize money is split based on the number of surviving contestants.

The Squid Game board game will release on July 30th, and will be exclusive to US retailer Walmart. Because nothing skewers capitalism quite like packaging up a series of traditional playground games and selling them for $25 in a single outlet.


About the Author

Matt Jarvis avatar

Matt Jarvis

Editor-in-chief, Dicebreaker

After starting his career writing about music, films and video games for various places, Matt spent many years as a technology, PC and video game journalist before writing about tabletop games as the editor of Tabletop Gaming magazine. He joined Dicebreaker as editor-in-chief in 2019, and has been trying to convince the rest of the team to play Diplomacy since.

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