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Neil Gaiman, His Dark Materials and Worzel Gummidge inspired this creepy folk RPG

Step Through the Hedgerow.

Artwork for Through the Hedgerows RPG
Image credit: Osprey Games

A new tabletop roleplaying game takes inspiration from beloved and iconic examples of British fantasy.

Through the Hedgerow is an upcoming tabletop roleplaying game that reportedly takes inspiration from the works of Neil Gaiman, the writer behind popular books, graphic novels and comic book series such as Coraline, The Sandman, American Gods and Stardust, as well as co-creating Good Omens, which is currently being adapted into a television series by Amazon Studios.

Another inspiration for Through the Hedgerow are the works of British author Philip Pullman, who is perhaps best known for the His Dark Materials series of books – with the first book being adapted into a full feature film in 2007, called The Golden Compass, and the original trilogy also getting adapted into a BBC television series which ran from 2019 to 2022.

Artwork for Through the Hedgerows RPG
Image credit: Osprey Games

Alongside this, Through the Hedgerow was reportedly inspired by the 1970s and ‘80s British television series Worzel Gummidge starring Jon Pertwee – who is also known for playing Doctor Who between 1970 and 1983 – about a scarecrow who comes to life and takes a gaggle of children on adventures across the countryside.

Through the Hedgerow is a fantasy TRPG that sees players becoming members of the Knights of the Briar Company, an organisation that protects the world of magic against the threat of incoming darkness. As Champions of Light, the players will be travelling across time – from the Dark Ages to the 17th century to the Industrial Revolution – to ensure that the agents of the Dark do not enact their plans.

Players can create their own fay creatures in the RPG, choosing from all manner of strange beings such as animated scarecrows, intelligent spiders and sorcerous birds, or decide to play as a mortal who has stumbled upon a world they had no idea existed. During the game, players use a Checks & Challenges gameplay system that’s designed to enable players to contribute to the story in a variety of ways.

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As they explore the world in search of magical artefacts, protect important locales and defeat the agents of the Dark, players will need to use their wits, imagination, charm and mysticism to overcome the challenges ahead. Players can expect to face the likes of fay lords, witch hunters, hags and Raven Margrave, who has the ability to raise the dead.

Through the Hedgerow was created by Jonathan Rowe, whose Hedgerow Hack served as the basis for his new tabletop RPG, with artwork by Peter Johnston: who has previously made art for Heirs to Heresy: Faith & Fear. Osprey Games is the publisher responsible for releasing Through the Hedgerow, with the studio previously releasing RPGs such as Hard City and Crescendo of Violence.

The release date for Through the Hedgerow is set for May 30th 2024, with the hardback version of the RPG being available for $35 (£28) and the digital version for $24.50 (£19.73).

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Through the Hedgerow

Tabletop Game

About the Author
Alex Meehan avatar

Alex Meehan

Senior Staff Writer

After writing for Kotaku UK, Waypoint and Official Xbox Magazine, Alex became a member of the Dicebreaker editorial family. Having been producing news, features, previews and opinion pieces for Dicebreaker for the past three years, Alex has had plenty of opportunity to indulge in her love of meaty strategy board games and gothic RPGS. Besides writing, Alex appears in Dicebreaker’s D&D actual play series Storybreakers and haunts the occasional stream on the Dicebreaker YouTube channel.
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